Project

Digitisation

Attribution - During a period of seven years, 137.200 hours of video, 22.510 hours of film, 123.900 hours of audio, and 2.9 million photos from the archives involved will be restored, preserved, and digitized.
Project

Copyright arrangements

Images for the Future wants to sufficiently collect and record intellectual property rights information, so that a lack in copyright information does not become an obstruction in disclosing and exploiting the material. The project aims to clear as much content as possible, by closing window agreements with copyright holders or their representatives. Content that has spent years collecting dust will again be released into the market. For copyrights this means the project has to think deeply about (...)
Project

Restoring and Preserving

 - A significant share of the hundreds and thousands of hours of film, audio, and video material, as well as the millions of photos that lay stocked in the archives, has to be guarded against perman (...)
Project

Costs and benefits

The Images for the Future consortium assumes that the collections represent great value. It has asked the Foundation for Economic Research (SEO) to test this assumption, resulting in the set-up of an area code prefix costs and benefits analysis.
Project

Project plan

The ‘Project plan Images for the Future’, written in 2006, forms the foundation of the project. Driving it was the serious decay of archival institutions’ audiovisual collections, as well as their limited accessibility and search functions. Behind the plan stand four parties that have joined forces in the Images for the Future Consortium.