Results

Project

Making available and target groups

The archives of Sound and Vision, EYE, and the National Archive store an enormous amount of interesting, moving, historical, important, rare, and unknown material. Our national audiovisual heritage is contained by kilometers of storing shelves, bunkers, cellars, and safes. When a large part of these archives is digitized, these visual historical gems will be released. They will be given a new life, as educational material, as input for television programs, as web applications, as games, or as en (...)
Project

Copyright arrangements

Images for the Future wants to sufficiently collect and record intellectual property rights information, so that a lack in copyright information does not become an obstruction in disclosing and exploiting the material. The project aims to clear as much content as possible, by closing window agreements with copyright holders or their representatives. Content that has spent years collecting dust will again be released into the market. For copyrights this means the project has to think deeply about (...)
Research

Education in bits and pieces

 - ODE stands for Online Distribution Engine. It aims to be a store where educators can buy little bits of digital content and put them back together any way they like, a proces dubbed ‘Mash up teac (...)
Research

Tagging as research tool

Research shows that people are getting more active on the internet as ‘prosumers’. This challenges traditional market research in a profound way. How to get rich data from your consumers in a digital world? New methods are developed to do user research. Ruigrok Netpanel runs an interesting pilot where participants can tag products.
Research

Games motivate students with a concentration problem

Small scale research conducted by Cherifa Hendriks (Hogeschool Arnhem Nijmegen) shows that the effects of games are positive on students with concentration problems. Should education follow the rules of game?
Research

Open up the goldmine in the UK

“The cultural heritage community sits on a goldmine of images, texts, sounds, films, video, data and metadata of immense interest to wide variety of of specific sectors and the general public.” With that statement Jordan S. Hatcher and Eduserv open the Snapshot study on the use of open content licenses in the UK cultural heritage sector. 107 Cultural heritage organisations participated in the UK-wide survey.